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Great News for Budget Travelers!

By Robert Firpo-Cappiello
October 7, 2013
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Cosmo Condina / SuperStock

Where are you going next? That's a question I ask myself all the time—both as executive editor at Budget Travel and as, well, someone who loves the word next almost as much as the world going. So I'm really psyched to announce that Budget Travel is making it easier than ever to book an amazing travel deal.

We've vastly expanded the number and variety of our Real Deals to help get you where you want to go for the right price. That means in addition to the sweet package deals our editors serve up every day, we are now offering affordable getaways courtesy of Travelzoo (recent deals include vacations in the Caribbean, Ireland, Italy, Spain, and other must-see locales around the globe). You'll find new deals here every day, you can search by destination or by the area you'll be leaving from, and you can arrange deals by price or trip length.

With more deals, more variety, and unbeatable prices—not to mention our award-winning feature stories, photography, and up-to-the-minute blog posts—Budget Travel is more committed than ever to giving you everything you need to choose your next dream trip.

Me? I've got my eye on Ireland. How about you? Where are you going next?

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Budget Travel Lists

7 Most Haunted U.K. Landmarks

Sophie Gackowski writes for HomeAway UK It's almost Halloween, and while we don't celebrate the 31st of October with quite as much gusto as the USA, we've more than our fair share of ghosts and ghouls. Indeed, many historical sites in the U.K. claim to be some of the most haunted in the world; whether they're hotels, public houses or harbours, they attract hundreds of tourists looking for hair-raising holidays. If you're planning a break in the U.K. anytime soon, you'll find dozens of phantasmal sites; but before you start considering where to stay and what to do, why not spook yourself senseless with seven of our most nerve-tingling sites? Princes in the Tower of London. Situated in the English capital, the Tower of London is—undisputedly—one of the U.K.'s most haunted historical sites; anywhere that's been home to hundreds of prisoners awaiting the death sentence has got to be pretty ghastly! Two of the most famed of the tower's prisoners are undoubtedly the little princes: Edward V and Richard, Duke of York. Imprisoned when they were just twelve and nine-years-old respectively, they were supposedly smothered on the orders of their uncle Richard III. While not proven, two small skeletons were unearthed here in 1674, and later buried at Westminster Abbey. Spectral Children at Llancaiach Fawr Manor. Located in Caerphilly, Wales, Llancaiach Fawr Manor is set in a spectacular, but spooky, spot. Numerous members of staff have detailed uncanny events (smelling roast beef is one of the stranger experiences!), and visitors continue to experience odd happenings. One of the most haunted sites in Britain, the manor is said to be home to several spectres: the most tragic is a little boy who fell to his death from the upper floor, and today tugs on sleeves to get attention. Headless Horses at Pluckley. Pluckley is a pretty village situated in the heart of picturesque Kent; and a famously haunted hotspot, said to house some 12 separate ghosts (according to the Guinness Book of World Records!). From an old woman selling watercress to a schoolmaster once found hanging, there's a seemingly different ghost for every street. The best known apparition is probably the spectral coach, said to be led by galloping, headless horses. Halloween here marks a spooky celebration like no other. Lord Soulis at Hermitage Castle. If you're taking a trip to bonny Scotland on your vacation, consider visiting Hermitage Castle in Roxburghshire. It's not only said to be the most perfect example of a Borders medieval castle, but also home to several spectres, too. Once in the possession of William de Soulis—a warlock thought to have abducted children for black magic rites—the ancient castle's halls are said to be stalked by his unfortunate victims, with unexplained sounds just one of the reported oddities. Florrie at the Red Lion. Fancy something a little more fun in way of ghouls? Then head to Avebury, England, where you'll encounter the Red Lion's feisty resident Florrie. Thought to have lived during the inn's 17th century heyday as a farmhouse, Florrie's tale is more tragic than her movements: said to have been murdered by her husband in a fit of rage, today she makes chandeliers spin and favours bearded men. Afterwards, why not take in Wiltshire's spectacular Stonehenge, nearby? Pendle Witches at Newchurch-in-Pendle. Nestled in the lovely landscapes of Lancashire, you'll find the hamlet of Newchurch-in-Pendle. Peer behind its pretty facade, however, and you'll find that in 1612, this was home to the largest legal witch hunt in England's history. Claims from a nobleman that he was attacked by witches on Pendle Hill resulted in the trials, convictions and deaths of ten people, now said to haunt the hillside. Today, Halloween sees dozens of people climb its slopes in the dead of night. Wounded Jacobites at Culloden Moor. Culloden Moor is famed as the setting of the last battle to have ever taken place on British soil; but the bloody events of 1746 left more than just words in the history books. Today, the boggy ground around Invernesshire, Scotland, is said to be home to the remnants of Bonnie Prince Charlie's army; namely, the ghosts of wounded Jacobites who fought for the Stuart family's right to the throne, but were slaughtered in their thousands that day. Even birds are said to avoid the area! Follow Sophie Gackowski on Google+

Budget Travel Lists

8 Budget-Friendly Ranch Vacations

Darley Newman is the five-time Daytime Emmy Award nominated host, writer and producer of the lifestyle travel TV series Equitrekking, which broadcasts on PBS and international networks in over 82 countries. Looking for an affordable ranch vacation? If you've done your research, you know that prices vary widely from under $1,000 per person per week to over $4,000. While many ranches offer all-inclusive weeks, others charge for additional activities and may be in remote locales, which means figuring out the total cost of getting there and what you'll do when you arrive can involve crunching the numbers.  With multi-generational travel trending and many families interested in giving their children an experience in nature, it's even more important to find ranches that offer a good value for families and groups. If you're ready for a ranch vacation, check out these inexpensive ranches located throughout North America, where you can ride the great outdoors and take in nature without compromising your bank account. Sundance Trail Ranch, Colorado. This family-friendly and pet-friendly dude ranch, located only 2 hours from Denver, offers horseback riding, hiking, rock climbing, whitewater rafting, and more in the Colorado Rocky Mountains. Lodge and cabin suites accommodate up to 24 guests with some offering wheelchair accessibility. Hearty western meals are served family style, with homemade breads and desserts. (Sundance Trail Ranch operates as a summer guest ranch and fall, winter and spring bed & breakfast. All-inclusive summer rates for 7-day/ 6-night stay, including lodging, meals, and activities, start at $1,610 per adult. This ranch offers 4-day/3-night stays starting at $970 for adults with lower rates for kids. Airport shuttle service and tips are additional.) Marble Mountain Ranch, California. This California dude ranch is surrounded by a half a million acres of Northern California's Klamath National Forest, making for plenty of room for adventure. Offering a multi-sport "saddle-paddle" vacation, guests can mix horseback riding with whitewater rafting, fishing, and shooting sports. This guest ranch offers a strong kids program for "Young Buckaroos." Marble Mountain Guest Ranch's location in Somes Bar is close to the scenic Trinity Alps and Russian Wilderness Areas. (5-night/ 6-day all-inclusive package rates
are $1,590 per adult. Gift shop purchases, jet boat tours, and gratuities are not included. The ranch does not charge a single supplement, making it a good choice for single travelers. The ranch also offers shorter 3-night stays during certain times of the year. Before the Memorial Day holiday and after Labor Day, you rent cabins a-la-carte without the all-inclusive full service packages starting at $125 per night double occupancy plus $20 for additional occupants.) New Haven Working Cattle & Guest Ranch, Wyoming. This family owned and operated working cattle ranch is situated on the edge of the Black Hills of Wyoming near Devils Tower National Monument. With a maximum of 8 guests at a time, travelers at New Haven Ranch can take part in various ranch activities, like moving cattle from pasture to pasture, doctoring cattle, round-ups, checking on fences and reservoirs, and more. Guests stay in comfortable rustic bedrooms, each with its own bathroom. ($1,365 per person per week, all-inclusive for 7-days, based on double occupancy. Lower rates available in the off-season in October. There is an additional 10% gratuity charge and $23.10 per week lodging and sales tax.) Southern Cross Guest Ranch, Georgia. This year-round family-owned guest ranch and horse farm located about an hour East of Atlanta in Central Georgia has over 200 horses. An unusual feature of this dude ranch, besides its location in Georgia, is that experienced horseback riders can take out a horse from Southern Cross and ride unguided. This Georgia dude ranch gets good reviews from travelers, especially horseback riders, for the riding activities, horses and food. (This ranch offers a variety of rates, ranging from B&B to all-inclusive. The all-inclusive plan includes twice daily horseback riding, three meals, snacks and desserts, lodging, unlimited non-alcoholic beverages, use of mountain bikes, and more starting at $100 per person per night, based on seven nights double-occupancy.) Bar W Guest Ranch, Montana. This year-round guest ranch nestled at the base of a mountain on Spencer Lake in Whitefish, Montana offers a wide range of warm and cold weather activities including cattle drives, archery, fishing, square dances, dog sledding, snowmobiling and more. With up to 50 guests, Bar W offers Western style accommodations in either lodge or cabin suites, as well as "glamping"—luxury camping. (6-night/ 5-day all-inclusive rates, which include accommodations, meals, and all ranch activities, range from $1,695 to $2,265 during June, July and August. Rates are lower in the fall, winter and spring and 3-night/ 2-day stays are also available. There is a 10% service charge added to the bill upon checkout.) Elkhorn Ranch, Arizona. This winter season Arizona guest ranch in the Baboquivari Mountains southwest of Tucson, Arizona has been continuously owned and operated by the Miller family since 1945. With only 20 cabins and an average capacity of 32 guests, this intimate desert escape offers birding in Sonoran Desert, a heated swimming pool, tennis court, horseback riding, hiking and special workshops, like digital photography. Elkhorn Ranch's 10,000 acres provide plenty of remote canyon and mountain country to explore, making for a true wilderness experience for the whole family. (Weekly rate is $1,524 per person per week single or double cabin, plus 15% gratuity and tax, with lower rates available for longer stays and additional guests in the same cabin.) HorseWorks Wyoming, Wyoming. This ranch is a good fit for travelers who want to play cowboy or cowgirl on an authentic working horse and cattle ranch. Along with owner Nate Brown, a well-known Wyoming cowboy now in his 90's, guests can participate in ranch chores and focus on horse related activities, including trail rides through sagebrush flats and grassy slopes, cattle drives, barrel racing and roping lessons. Meals are hearty and accommodations are simple in rustic cabins with bunk beds. HorseWorks Wyoming is located in north central Wyoming in the town of Grass Creek, a little over two hours drive from Yellowstone National Park's East Gate and less than an hour's drive from the Buffalo Bill Historical Center in Cody and hot springs in Thermopolis. ($1,100 per person for Sunday to Friday night stays. Price includes round-trip transportation by local shuttle service between Cody and the ranch, unlimited riding, cabin accommodations (up to 4 people each), meals and snacks, and an overnight camping option.) Rancho Los Banos, Mexico. This working cattle ranch and eco-adventure destination on 30,000 acres in northeast Mexico welcomes adventure travelers to experience horse riding, cattle work, biking, hiking, bird watching, kayaking and more. With only 12 to 14 guests at a time, you can bank on personalized attention. Positioned at the foot of the Sierra Madre, the Mexican Rockies, Rancho Los Baños mixes traditional guest ranch activities with sustainable tourism, nature and adventure. The ranch ranges in elevation from 7,400 feet above sea level in the northern border to 3,200 feet in the southern canyon country, which includes the stunning El Cajon Canyon. This guest ranch offers immersion in pristine wilderness and a true off-the-grid experience (no internet or cell phone reception). (Prices are all-inclusive, including transfers from Tucson, Arizona, and start as low as $139 per person per night, double occupancy for a 5-night minimum stay, not including taxes.) Learn more about great ranch vacations in the Equitrekking Vacation Guide, an online, searchable travel guide to great dude ranches, guest ranches and global horseback riding vacations, and at Top20Ranches. Check out exclusive ranch and riding vacation travel deals on Equitrekking Travel Deals.

Budget Travel Lists

7 Incredible Grand Tours You Can Actually Afford

Sometimes a one-week vacation just isn't enough, especially when you wake up the last morning of your trip and don't want to leave yet—it's too soon, and you've just begun to discover what makes your destination so special. Luckily, there are longer grand tours that provide you with enough time to fullly explore a new place, whether it's a month-long journey through Southeast Asia or an in-depth two-week Ireland adventure. We've scoured the world of extended travel deals for packages that give you the most bang for your buck, listed here in order from the least amount of money you'll spend per day to most. At first it might seem like you are spending a little more than usual on some of these trips, but the perks included—meals, intra-country transportation, airport transfers, professionally guided small-group tours with a personal touch—and the unique travel experiences you'll get more than make up for any initial sticker-shock. SEE THE GRAND TOURS! India: basics on a budget Highlights: Visit ancient forts and colorful modern cities throughout Northern India. Looking to do some traveling abroad while on a budget? This three-week tour of Northern India and Rajasthan is full of unique experiences—an overnight camel safari in the desert, anyone?—and gives you just enough free time to explore the cities on your own. You'll also get guided tours of New Delhi, Bikaner, Jaisalmer, Jodhpur, Pushkar, Udaipur, and Jaipur, plus the chance to experience sunrise at the Savitri temple in Pushkar and wrap things up with a scenic boat trip down the River Ganges during a candle flower ceremony. The breakdown: This three-week tour of Northern India and Rajasthan will cost you about $67 per day including 19 nights' accommodations, all ground transportation within the country, and several guided tours. G Adventures, from $1,349 per person for a 20-day trip. Average group size: 10-16 people. Central America for the trail-blazing history buff Highlights: Tour ancient ruins and jungles in Mexico, Belize, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, and Costa Rica. Dreaming of visiting the ancient Mayan ruins of Tulum, Palenque, Chichén Itzá, Tikal, and Copán? This extensive small-group tour starts in Mexico City with a vast cultural tour of Mexico—explore the colonial buildings of Puebla, Oaxaca, and San Cristobal de las Casas before heading north to the Yucatán cities of Palenque, Mérida, and Playa del Carmen. Next, you'll cross the border to Belize and soak up the Central American sun in Caye Caulker, before heading south to Flores, Guatemala—shop for the perfect souvenir at the local markets of Chichicastenango and take time to roam the colorful city of Antigua. Ponder the past at the Mayan ruins in Copán and relax on the beaches of Roatán Island during your time in Honduras. From here, the tour heads south through Granada and Ometepe Island in Nicaragua before finishing up with trips to Costa Rica's tropical cloud forests, Arenal Volcano National Park, and San José, the country's capitol city. The breakdown: You'll end up spending $71 per day including all ground transportation, guided tours, and 45 nights' accommodations in hotels, one night in a local homestay, and one night on an overnight bus. Intrepid Travel's Central America Explorer, from $3,295 for a 46-day trip. Average group size: 16 people. New Zealand: affordable island-hopping for nature lovers and adrenaline junkies Highlights: Tour New Zealand's North and South Islands for less. Get to know this intriguing kiwi nation with a three-week trip through both islands. The tour starts and ends in Auckland, and includes some truly "only in New Zealand" experiences like Maori cultural encounters, sea kayaking in the Doubtful Sound, surfing lessons in Raglan, and a trip to Franz Josef National Park. Other adrenaline-pumping activities include a mountain biking excursion and the chance to take on the Tongariro Alpine Crossing, one of the most popular one-day treks in the country. Hiking, biking and opportunities to skydive and bungee jump are also available if you're feeling extra gutsy. The breakdown: You'll spend $112 a day including all intra-country transportation, 20 nights' worth of accommodations, guided tours, and most meals. G Adventures, from $2,359 per person for a 21-day trip. Average tour size: 12 people. An African safari adventure from Kenya to Cape Town Highlights: Meet the locals and spot the Big Five in Kenya, Tanzania, Malawi, Mozambique, Zimbabwe, Botswana, Namibia, and South Africa. If you're an adventurous animal lover with a month and a half to spare, this tour is right up your alley. Keep your eyes out for the Big Five as you zig-zag your way through eight African countries and stop to see the animals they're known for on a number of game drives and walks through the African bush. You'll also get to visit spice plantations in Zanzibar, feel the spray of Victoria Falls, and relax on the beaches of Lake Malawi. Get to know the locals by staying in several African villages along the way, giving you the chance to see what everyday life is like in the jungles and deserts of this intriguing continent. The breakdown: You'll end up spending $118 per day for this 45-day African adventure including 44 nights' accommodations, all ground transportation, guided tours, and most meals. Intrepid Travel, from $5,310 per person for a 45-day trip. Average tour size: 22 people. Best of the U.S. Highlights: An epic cross-country adventure from San Francisco to New York City and back, stopping at national parks and big cities around the country. Starting and ending in San Francisco, this 32-city tour of the United States' best attractions includes visits to Yosemite, the Grand Canyon, Carlsbad Caverns, Niagara Falls, Badlands National Park, Devil's Tower, Yellowstone, and Grand Teton National Park. The first half of the tour takes you through the heartland—gamble in Las Vegas, experience southwest culture in Santa Fe, and visit Elvis at Graceland—while the rest of it works through the big cities of the Northeast before sending you back through the northern states—ride to the top of the Sears Tower in Chicago, experience the Wild Wild West in South Dakota, and pay a visit to Old Faithful on your way back to the Golden State. The breakdown: This 44-day trip breaks down to $120 per day including all of your ground transportation in an air-conditioned van, 43 nights' accommodations, and guided city tours of San Francisco, Las Vegas, New Orleans, Washington D.C., and New York City. This package also covers most meals as well as entrance fees to all included National Parks, the Maid of the Mist boat tour in Niagara Falls, a trip to Arlington National Cemetery, and a beer tasting in Milwaukee. G Adventures, from $5,299 per person for a 44-day trip. Average tour size: 10-13 people. The ultimate tour of Southeast Asia Highlights: Visit temples, beaches, and historical spots throughout Thailand, Laos, Cambodia, and Vietnam. On this 29-day Southeast Asia adventure, you'll get to visit ancient temples like Chiang Mai, Wat Po, and Wat Rong Khun, sail down the Mekong River, spend the night at a homestay in a local Laotian village, and watch a traditional Vietnamese water puppets show. And that's just the first half of your trip—the rest has you cruising around Halong Bay, visiting the Royal Tombs in Hue, exploring historic Hoi An, touring the Cu Chi tunnels near Ho Chi Minh City, and cruising the Mekong Delta before you head into Cambodia for a sobering historical tour of the Killing Fields and guided tours of Angkor Wat's spectacular temple complex. The breakdown: You'll spend $121 a day including all guided tours, entrance fees, ground transportation, regional flights and boat rides between countries, accommodations, and most meals. G Adventures, from $3,499 per person for a 29-day trip. Average group size: 10-15 people. Grand tour of Ireland Highlights: Visit Dublin, Killarney, Belfast, Derry, Blarney, Galway, Kerry, Cliffs of Moher, Dingle Peninsula, and experience a traditional medieval dinner in an Irish castle. Erin go bragh! This grand tour of Ireland gives you eleven days to explore both the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland. You'll visit legendary places like the Giant's Causeway and get guided tours of twenty major sites and attractions including Trinity College's Book of Kells, the Guinness Brewery Storehouse, city tours of Belfast and Galway, a trip to the Titanic Belfast Experience, scenic tours of the Cliffs of Moher, Ring of Kerry, and Dingle Peninsula, plus a traditional medieval dinner in an Irish castle. Just don't forget to bring your camera! The breakdown: Round-trip multicity airfares between New York City, Dublin, and Shannon start from $697 in early October (Aer Lingus). The land-only portion of this trip ends up being about $1,702 per person, or $131 per person per day. SmarTours, from $2,399 per person for an 11-day trip including international airfare from New York City. Average tour size: 35-40 people. Book this package by Nov. 6th before prices increase by $400.

Budget Travel Lists

10 "Hidden Gems" You'll Love This Summer!

Psst. Can you keep a secret? If you're looking for a world-class vacation minus the crowds, Budget Travel has got a hot tip. Well, actually we've got 10 of them. Over the past year we've visited some of America's most amazing parklands and unique small towns. Stretching across the U.S., our list of beautiful hidden gems includes ocean spray, lapping lakeshores, forests, mountains, and some of the nicest hosts you'll ever meet. What all these places have in common is that you might have never heard of them without BT's spilling the beans. Enjoy! SEE 10 BEAUTIFUL AMERICAN PARKS! 1. VALLEY OF FIRE STATE PARK  Nevada One of the state's best-loved parks is the Valley of Fire, 42,000 arid acres about an hour's drive northeast from Las Vegas. The park delivers its own kind of high-stakes drama, trading neon and nightclubs for 150-million-year-old sandstone formations and 3,000-year-old petroglyphs (images carved in rock). You could even say it has star quality: The surreal, burnt-sienna landscape stood in for Mars in the 1990 movie Total Recall. If you're embarking on your own photo safari or DIY sci-fi flick in Nevada's largest state park, don't miss Arch Rock, Elephant Rock, or the Beehives, all of which are essentially solid-stone versions of exactly what they sound like. And be sure to take snapshots with and without people in the frame—the structures are even more outstanding when you can get a sense of their scale. Most important of all: Bring lots of water with you. There are few facilities within the park, and the sandy stretches of some hikes make them more strenuous than you'd think, particularly in the summer, when Mojave Desert temperatures top 120 degrees. Best to come in spring or fall for a more comfortable trip. Where to stay: The park contains 72 campsites, including RV spots with water and electrical hookups (campsites cost $20 per night plus $10 for hookups; There is a $2 discount for Nevada residents). If that's not your speed, the family-run North Shore Inn has a pool, in-room fridges, and powerful air conditioning (northshoreinnatlakemead.com, doubles from $85). 2. BEAUFORT  North Carolina Captain Horatio Sinbad is what you might call a friendly pirate. He's got six cannons on his 54-foot brigantine, the Meka II, but he's also got Wi-Fi. He's got a gold tooth and a gold hoop in his left ear, but his mate lovingly wears the matching earring on a chain around her neck (and brings him coffee on deck). He makes his living as a pirate, sailing the East Coast to lead mock invasions—"historical entertainments," as he calls them—then dutifully returns to Beaufort, N.C., every chance he gets. "The water is clean, the fishing is great, and the people are friendly," he says. "This is home port for me." If you'd just dropped into Beaufort, you might be surprised to find that a pirate has weighed anchor there. Perched on an especially serene stretch of the North Carolina coast, the town has an air of Southern gentility about it, with restored 17th- and 18th-century buildings that flank the local historical society. Feeling a shiver in your timbers? A cup of rich gumbo and a slice of salty, pillow-soft French bread at the Beaufort Grocery restaurant and bakery will warm you up nicely (117 Queen St., beaufortgrocery.com, cup of gumbo $4.25). There's even a thriving health-food store, the Coastal Community Market (606 Broad St., coastalcommunitymarket.com, locally made hummus $4). And yet Beaufort's got a wild side, starting with the undomesticated horses you'll see roaming just across Taylors Creek. Blackbeard himself sailed those waters, and his spirit pops up at the North Carolina Maritime Museum (315 Front St., ncmaritimemuseums.com, admission free), the Queen Anne's Revenge restaurant (510 Front St., qarbeaufort.com, crab-stuffed shrimp $15), and beyond. If he were alive, you'd almost certainly find him on a stool at the Backstreet Pub, a dive-bar-like joint that also serves as a live-music venue and a lending library for sailors. Owner Liz Kopf likes to call her place the funkiest bar from Maine to Venezuela: "I always say there are more characters per capita in here than anywhere in the state" (124 Middle Lane, historicbeaufort.com, beer $2 on Mondays and Tuesdays). Where to stay: Confederate jasmine and animal topiaries frame the Langdon House B&B (135 Craven St., langdonhouse.com, doubles from $108).  3. LUDINGTON STATE PARK  Michigan Snug between Lake Michigan and Hamlin Lake, this nearly 5,300-acre park has seven miles of sandy, dune-strewn beaches, a historic lighthouse you can climb, more than 20 miles of hiking trails (plus paths for biking and cross-country skiing), and the shallow, clear Big Sable River, which is perfect for drifting down in an inner tube. No wonder Ludington has been a Great Lakes-area favorite since it was established 76 years ago. Where to stay: Ludington's four campgrounds fill up quickly; reserve campsites six months in advance or cabins and yurts one year out, when openings are posted (midnrreservations.com, camping from $16). You can also try the Lamplighter Bed & Breakfast, an 1892 home with an original oak banister, leaded-glass windows, and a porcelain-tiled fireplace (ludington-michigan.com, doubles from $115). 4. HAMMONDSPORT New York Hammondsport, N.Y., may well be the recycling capital of America. Not garbage recycling (though they do that, too). We're talking about the vintage seaplanes restored and flown by the Glenn H. Curtiss Museum (8419 State Rte. 54, glennhcurtissmuseum.org, admission $8.50). The birdhouses made of scrap wood in front of the Aroma Coffee Art Gallery (60 Shethar St., 607/569-3047, birdhouses from $40). Even the cypress paneling in the Bully Hill Vineyard's lower dining room came from old wine barrels (8843 Greyton H. Taylor Memorial Dr., bullyhill.com, smoked pulled pork sandwich $13). "When my husband and I came back to live here, the first thing he did was start restoring old boats," says Nancy Wightman, whose husband, Ed, grew up in the Finger Lakes region. "It's not just about loving history. You get the sense that's who the people here are." It's tempting to say that there's something in the water, but Hammondsport's passion for the past really comes via the wine. The Pleasant Valley Wine Company, opened in 1860, was the first in the Finger Lakes region (8260 Pleasant Valley Rd., pleasantvalleywine.com, bottles from $6). In 1962, a Ukrainian viticulturist further transformed the local wine industry at his Dr. Konstantin Frank Vinifera Wine Cellars by successfully planting European grapes in the colder New York climate (9749 Middle Rd., drfrankwines.com, bottles from $9). Today, both those wineries—and several more—are mainstays of the landscape. That's literally true of Dr. Frank's, which sits on an impossibly green piece of land overlooking its vineyards and sparkling, Y-shaped Keuka Lake. The vineyard is run by Fred Frank, Konstantin's grandson. "I enjoy hearing stories about children sitting on my grandfather's knee 40 years ago," says Fred. "That's very rewarding." Also rewarding: After all these years, tastings at Dr. Frank's are still free. In fact, many of the best things in Hammondsport are. Sunbathing on condo-less Keuka Lake, kicking back on the town square for outdoor summer concerts on Thursday nights, jam sessions in the basement of the Union Block Italian Bistro—spring for one of the plus-size meals, such as linguini and clam sauce (31 Shethar St., unionblockitalian.com, linguini with clam sauce $19). "We're pretty darn proud of what we've built here," says Mayor Emery Cummings, who has lived in Hammondsport for every one of his 54 years, "and we're hoping to keep it the way it's always been." Where to stay: You'll find a spiral staircase, crown moldings, and bits of vintage wallpaper in the octagonal 1859 home that has been converted into the Black Sheep Inn (8329 Pleasant Valley Rd., stayblacksheepinn.com, doubles from $149).  5. CACHE RIVER STATE NATURAL AREA  Illinois There are more famous swamps than the one in Cache River State Natural Area, a nearly 15,000-acre Illinois state park 30 miles from the Kentucky border. The Everglades, say, or Okefenokee. But who wants a crowd along? One of the northernmost examples of a true Southern swamp, the delightfully under-the-radar Cache River park gets only about 200,000 annual visitors—that's about one visitor per acre per month. Other life forms aren't nearly so scarce here: The park's wetlands, floodplains, forests, and limestone barrens harbor more than 100 threatened or endangered species. It's best explored by canoe, along six miles of paddling trails that bring you face-to-face with massive tupelo and cypress trunks. There are also 20 miles of foot trails in the park and a floating boardwalk that leads to the center of Heron Pond, which is carpeted in summer with a bright-green layer of floating duckweed. BYO boat, or rent one from White Crane Canoe and Pirogue Rentals in Ullin, Ill., about 12 miles west (whitecranerentals.com, canoe rental $15 per person per day). Where to stay: A half-hour drive west of the park, Anna, Ill., has a handful of antiques shops, a pottery museum, and the Davie School Inn, an 11-room, all-suite B&B in a converted 1910 schoolhouse (davieschoolinn.com, doubles from $100). 6. WEAVERVILLE  California You expect certain trappings in any Gold Rush town. A saloon, a main street, maybe a hitching post. Also a 138-year-old working Chinese temple. No? You'll find one in Weaverville, where the Joss House State Historic Park is a testament to the town's unsung history of tolerance (630 Main St., parks.ca.gov, admission $4). Chinese immigrants, facing discrimination in ports such as San Francisco, were welcomed here and ultimately accounted for up to 25 percent of the Rush-era population. "Some of our staff looks at this place as a museum piece you just have to keep clean and take care of," says guide Jack Frost. "But Chinese people who work in the parks system say it's a national treasure." Maybe it's the mining connection, but Weaverville is a place where you often strike it rich in unexpected places. The 1854 drugstore and bank are now home to the La Grange Cafe, which features a wildly creative menu of boar, rabbit, and buffalo-as well as an impressive wine cellar in the old bank vault (520 Main St., 530/623-5325, buffalo burger $11). Mamma Llama Eatery & Cafe hosts a surprisingly funky roster of live musicians: Gypsy jazz, junkyard percussion, even didgeridoo (490 Main St., mammallama.com, hoagie $5.75). Where to stay: One place that hews to a more period Old West experience is the 132-year-old Weaverville Hotel, which features four-poster beds, clawfoot tubs, and a peaceful Victorian library (481 Main St., weavervillehotel.com, doubles from $99). 7. BLACKWATER FALLS STATE PARK  West Virginia Blackwater Falls's namesake cascade isn't just the most picturesque spot in this 2,456-acre park—it's also one of the most photographed places in the state. The area is equally eye-catching when it's dressed in the bright greens of spring, the Crayola-box colors of autumn, or silvery winter, when parts of the falls freeze into man-size icicles. The falls themselves—more brown than black—get their distinctive hue from tannic acid that leaches into the river from hemlock and red spruce needles upstream. Where to stay: Outdoorsy types can pitch a tent at 65 campsites, or upgrade to one of 26 deluxe cabins with full kitchens, private bathrooms, and fireplaces—but not A/C. For that creature comfort, you'll need to book a night in the 54-room lodge, which also has a game room and an indoor pool (blackwaterfalls.com, camping from $20, lodge rooms from $84). 8. DAMASCUS  Virginia If you decide to drive to Damascus, you'll likely be in the minority. This is hiking and cycling heaven, where seven major trails intersect, including the undulating Virginia Creeper and the granddaddy of them all: the 2,180-mile Appalachian Trail. In a nifty bit of irony, six of the seven trails converge in a parking lot, at Mojoes Trailside Coffee House (331 Douglas Dr., mojoestrailsidecoffee.com, lattes from $3.50), where most mornings you'll find a clutch of locals and through-hikers chatting about travel plans. Breakfast is the big meal in town, and the more energy-boosting calories the better. Yet the carbo-loading, hard-core trekkers you'll find in Damascus don't always look as you'd expect. "Mamaw B." (her adopted trail name) was in town beginning her usual 15- to 18-mile hike. She's 71 and has been backpacking for 31 years. "The secret to good health is to remain active and to always have something to look forward to," she says, as she sets off from Mojoes toward-where, exactly? She just smiles and points north. Where to stay: The Lazy Fox Inn is famous less for its trailside location than for its legendary country breakfast that includes cheese grits, scrambled eggs, hashbrowns, biscuits and gravy, and sausage (133 Imboden St., lazyfoxinn.com, doubles with private bath from $85).     9. KATY TRAIL STATE PARK  Missouri The largest rails-to-trails conversion in America, the 240-mile Katy Trail spans Missouri's midsection, from Clinton in the west to Machens in the east, along the former track of the Missouri-Kansas-Texas (MKT) Railroad (a.k.a. the Katy). The mostly flat path is open to hikers and cyclists—and in some sections, horseback riders—and traverses historic railroad bridges, tunnels, forests, valleys, and open fields. In spots, it skirts the edge of the Missouri River. Some hardy souls tackle the whole trail (a roughly five-day undertaking for an experienced cyclist). Those who prefer a more leisurely trek should consider a day-trip between Rocheport and Boonville, two early-19th-century towns (the latter established by Daniel Boone's offspring) separated by 12 miles of nature preserves, vineyards, and river views. Where to stay: There are no campgrounds in the park, but you can have your pick of small-town inns along the route. Some cater to cyclists with extras such as free laundry service, double-size whirlpool tubs, and free bike storage and tune-up tools. Rocheport's School House Bed & Breakfast, in a three-story brick schoolhouse from 1914, sweetens the deal with fresh-baked cookies at check-in (schoolhousebb.com, doubles from $149). 10. OHIOPYLE STATE PARK Pennsylvania If ever there were an all-purpose park, southwestern Pennsylvania's Ohiopyle State Park is it. Looking for waterfalls? It has four (including the one in our slide show above, which seems as if it must have inspired Frank Lloyd Wright's Fallingwater house, just five miles away). Trails? Hikers get 79 miles of them—plus 27 miles for cyclists, 11 for folks on horseback, and nearly 40 for cross-country skiers. And why not throw in a natural water slide or two? The lifeblood of the 20,000-acre park, however, is the Youghiogheny River Gorge—a.k.a. the Yough. The Middle Yough, which flows to Ohiopyle from Confluence, Pa., is the gentler section, with Class I and II rapids for rafters and kayakers; the Lower Yough, downstream, gets up to Class IV whitewater. Combined, they attract a good chunk of the 1 million people who visit the park every year. Where to stay: The quietest campsites in Ohiopyle's Kentuck campground are the walk-in sites numbered 51-64 and 103-115; however, some folks have found the camp's firm 9 p.m. quiet hours a little too restrictive. If your brood tends to get livelier as the night wears on, consider a vacation rental in Hidden Valley, Pa., or Seven Springs, Pa., both less than 30 miles to the northeast; these two ski towns have solid selections of rental condos and homes that can be deeply discounted in the off-season (vrbo.com).

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